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DEPRESSION

Has someone you know just been diagnosed?

If someone you know has been diagnosed with depression, we’re here to help. After the appointment, there will be a million questions running through your mind. This page is here to give you a place to start. It looks at common feelings after diagnosis and gives you some next steps.

Talk to someone now

Our helpline is open from 8am – 8pm, every weekday. Whatever your situation, we’ll take the time to listen to your concerns. We’ll do our best to help you through, answer your questions, and find you the right support. Call us now:

0300 222 5709

DEPRESSION

Has someone you know just been diagnosed?

If someone you know has been diagnosed with depression, we’re here to help. After the appointment, there will be a million questions running through your mind. This page is here to give you a place to start. It looks at common feelings after diagnosis and gives you some next steps.

Need to talk to someone now?

Our helpline is open from 8am – 8pm, every weekday. Whatever your situation, we’ll take the time to listen to your concerns. We’ll do our best to help you through, answer your questions, and find you the right support. Call us now:

0300 222 5709

How you might feel after diagnosis

Guilty

How could I not have noticed? Why didn’t I recognise it sooner? How could I have let this happen to them? It’s natural to think about what you could have done with hindsight and have regrets.

You can’t do anything about the past. What matters now is how you support your loved one after diagnosis to recovery.

Overwhelmed

Depression is a difficult condition to understand. Talking to your loved one can feel like a minefield and a huge uphill struggle, where it feels like nothing you do or say has an effect. The responsibility of caring can feel like a huge burden. We’ve got some advice below on seeking help with your role.

Relieved?

Diagnosis can be a huge relief if you’ve spent a long time wondering why the person you care for has seemed different, and an even longer time trying to encourage them to see a GP. At least now you know there are things that can be done about it. There is a plan for their treatment, and there are other carers who have been in your position with advice to share.

Next steps

Want to now more about depression?

If you have never experienced depression or known anyone with it, read our pages on what depression is, types of depression and causes of depression.

Want to understand their treatment?

We’ve got a page explaining treatment options for mild depression and for moderate to severe depression. If the person you care for has been offered medication, we’ve answered the most common questions about medication here.

Not sure what you’re doing as their carer?

Take a look at our general advice on helping someone with depression, what to say, and what not to say.

Worried you can’t do it alone?

Our page on helping someone get further support looks at what services can support someone with depression. You might also want to read our advice on sharing your role with friends and family.

Remember: you are not alone

There is lots of support out there for you and the person you care for. Most people with depression will recover within a year. You can do this.

Along your journey, we can support you by answering any questions you might have and helping you access the right support. With online information, phone support, and our local expertise, our aim is to make it easier to get support in a system that can feel fragmented and hard to navigate. If this is the kind of support you might be interested in, join us as a member of HERE.

Prefer to read offline?

You might find our Hints & Tips about depression a useful companion through your journey. It’s an accessible booklet packed full of tips on caring for someone with dementia, including tips on talking, helping someone get support, and getting support for yourself, too.

Click here to get your copy now.